Nazarene Space

They Have Abandoned His Love
By
James Scott Trimm



As I stated recently the Mishnah recounts to us the question as to whether or not the Lost Ten Tribes will yet return:

The ten tribes are not destined to return,
since it is said, "And he cast them into another land,
as on this day" (Deut. 29:28).  
Just as the day passes and does not return,
so they have gone their way and will not return,"
the words of Rabbi Akiva.
Rabbi Eliezer says,
"Just as this day is dark and then grows light,
so the ten tribes for whom it is now dark--
thus in the future it is destined to grow light for them."
(m.San. 10:3)

The Gemara to this passage of Mishnah says:

Our Rabbis taught: The ten tribes have no portion in the world to come, as it says, And the Lord rooted them out of their land in anger, and in wrath, and in great indignation: And the Lord rooted them out of their land, refers to this world; and cast them into another land — to the world to come: this is R. Akiba's view. R. Simeon b. Judah, of the Kefar of Acco, said on R. Simeon's authority: If their deeds are as this day's, they will not return; otherwise they shall. Rabbi said: They will enter the future world, as it is said, [And it shall come to pass] in that day, that the great trumpet  shall be blown, [and they shall come which were ready to perish in the land of Assyria, and the outcasts in the land of  Egypt, and shall worship the Lord in the holy mount of Jerusalem]. (Is. 27:13)
(b.San. 110b)

It must be understood here that the "World to Come" here refers to the Messianic Kingdom.  There was a conflict between Akiva and Eliezer as to whether the Lost Ten Tribes would return.  In the Gemara we see that Rabbi Y'hudah, the Nasi of the Sanhedrin ruled in favor of Rabbi Eliezer's view, that the Ten Tribes would in fact return and have a part in the World to Come. (Whenever the Talmud refers to "Rabbi" without a name, it is a reference to Rabbi Y'hudah the Nasi).

This Gemara goes on to criticize Rabbi Akiba in this matter, saying that his position showed an unscriptural lack of compassion for the Ten Tribes:

Rabbah b. Bar Hana said in R. Johanan's name: [Here] R. Akiba abandoned his love, for it is written, “Go and proclaim these words toward the north, and say, Return, you backsliding Israel, says YHWH; and I will not cause my anger to fall upon you; for I am merciful, says YHWH, and I will not keep mine anger for ever” (Jer. 3:12).
(b.San. 110b)

In Jeremiah 3:6-18 the House of Israel returns and joins the House of Judah “one from a city, two from a family.”  (Jer. 3:14).  Here YHWH proclaims:

Go and proclaim these words toward the north, and say,
Return, you backsliding Israel, says YHWH;
and I will not cause my anger to fall upon you;
for I am merciful, says YHWH,
and I will not keep mine anger for ever.
(Jer. 3:12)

Rabbi Akiva’s view was:

The ten tribes are not destined to return,
since it is said, "And he cast them into another land,
as on this day" (Deut. 29:28).  
Just as the day passes and does not return,
so they have gone their way and will not return,"
(m.San. 10:3)

The Gemara tells us that Akiva’s view was wrong because it denied the love that YHWH expresses toward the Lost Ten Tribes in Jeremiah 3:12.  

Scattered among the Gentiles are untold numbers of descendants of the Lost Ten Tribes of Israel who are discovering their identity and their kinship to the Jewish people.  Those who agree with Rabbi Akiva in denying this truth have, like Akiva, “abandoned his love.” 

Views: 26

 

 

 


















 

LINKS

 

 

 

 

Badge

Loading…

© 2017   Created by James Trimm.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service