Nazarene Space

Kiss the Son- The Deception of Tovia Singer


KISS THE SON
THE DECEPTION OF TOVIA SINGER
By
James Scott Trimm


In Psalm 2 we read:

    The kings of the earth stand up,
    And the rulers take counsel together,
    Against YHWH, and against His Messiah:…
    I will tell of the decree:
    YHWH said to me: “You are My Son,”
    This day have I begotten you….
    Kiss the Son, lest he be angry…
    (Ps. 2:2, 7, 12)


Now in his deceptive anti-Missionary tape set titled (wrongly) "Lets Get Biblical" Tovia Singer refers to Psalm 2:12 saying "The word BAR in Hebrew does not quite mean 'son'."  

Tovia goes on to say:

"What we do is we look at all the other places where the word BAR exists and what I
did for you is I did you a favor.  I showed you every single place where the word BAR
appears in the Book of Psalms and you will notice that isn't it odd that the King
James Bible everywhere that the word appears in all its forms is always translated
cleanliness or purity?  Why if that word truly means son or sonship why isn't it
translated that way in other places?"

Notice here that Singer plays a shell game.  He starts out suggesting "we look at all the other places where the word BAR exists" then he leads you to believe that he has done this for you, but he has played a switch on you for what he actually has done instead is "showed you every single place where the word BAR appears in the Book of Psalms".  Then he switches back claiming to have shown that "everywhere that the word appears in all its forms is always translated cleanliness or purity".  And then poses the question "Why if that word truly means son or sonship why isn't it translated that way in other places?".

So he begins by telling you that we need to look at EVERY passage where the word appears, he then shows you ONLY the passages where the word appears in Psalms, then he CLAIMS to have proven that BAR is always translated "cleanliness or purity" and never as "son".  

The reason for this deception is that Singer knows full well that if we were to enlarge the search by even looking at the neighboring book of Proverbs we would find Proverbs 31:2 where we read:

"What, my son? And what, O son of my womb? And what, O son of my vows?"
(Proverbs 31:2 Jewish Publication Society version)

Every translation I have ever seen, be it Jewish, Christian or Secular renders BAR as "son" in this verse.  So now you see why Singer plays the shell game.  He has to tell you that he is showing you "all the other places where the word BAR exists" while he really only looks at the book of Psalms, and then he pretends to have shown you "everywhere where the word appears" for the sole purpose of deceiving you, because he cannot honestly look at all of the passages, or even to the neighboring book of Proverbs or you could plainly see that the word BAR can be and is translated from Hebrew as "son", even in Jewish sources.


In fact Jewish sources attest to "son" as a meaning of BAR in Hebrew even though Singer claims "The word BAR in Hebrew does not quite mean 'son'."   In the Student's Hebrew and Chaldee Dictionary to the Old Testament by Alexander Harkavy published by the Hebrew Publishing Company in 1914 (and currently available in reprint in our bookstore at http://nazarenespace.com/page/books-dvds) we read "In Heb. BAR [as Aramaic for "son"] occurs only in poetry Pr. 31,2."
 (p. 68 column 8).  The reader may notice that Psalms is also poetry, so Singer is plain wrong when he declares "The word BAR in Hebrew does not quite mean 'son'.".

In fact the tenth century Jewish scholar Abraham Ibn 'Ezra writes in his commentary on this very passage:

"Serve YHWH" (Ps. 2:7) refers to YHWH' and "kiss the son (BAR)" (Ps. 2:12) refers to
His Messiah; and behold the presence of BAR, is like that of "What, my son (BAR)..."
(Prov. 31:2)"

Notice Ibn 'Ezra not only understands BAR here to mean "son" but identifies this
"son:" as the Messiah! 

BAR in Psalm 2:12 is also understood to mean "son" in the Zohar:


We may also translate, “he who withholds blessings from the Son”, whom the Father and
Mother have crowned and blessed with many blessings, and concerning whom they
commanded, “Kiss the son lest he be angry” (Ps. II, 12), since he is invested both
with judgement (gevurah) and with mercy (chesed).
(Zohar 3:191b)

This "son" referenced in the Zohar is the Middle Pillar of the Godhead which the Zohar identifies as "The Son of Yah". The Zohar describes the three pillars of the Godhead as follows:

Then Elohim said, “Let thee be light; and there was light.
And Elohim saw that the light was good…
Why, it may be asked, was it necessary to repeat the word “light” in this verse? The
answer is that the first “light” refers to the primordial light which is of the Right
Hand, and it is destined for the “end of days”; while the second “light” refers to
the Left Hand, which issues from the Right.
The next words, “And God saw the light that it was good” (Gen. 1:4), refer to the
pillar which, standing midway between them, unites both sides, and therefore when the
unity of the three, right, left, and middle, was complete, “it was good”, since there
could be no completion until the third had appeared to remove the strife between
Right and Left, as it is written, “And God separated between the light and between
the darkness.”…
This is the Middle Pillar: Ki Tov (that it was good) threw light above and below and
on all other sides, in virtue of YHWH, the name which embraces all sides.
(Zohar 1:16b)


The right and left pillars are assigned as Mother and Father, the middle pillar, which balances the feminine and masculine characteristics from the male and female sides, is identified in the Zohar as "the Son of Yah".  The Zohar says:

Better is a neighbor that is near, than a brother far off.
This neighbor is the Middle Pillar in the Godhead, which is the Son of Yah.
(Zohar 2:115)

In another Passage the Zohar has:

The Holy One, blessed be He, has a son, whose glory (tifret) shines from one end of
the world to another.  He is a great and mighty tree, whose head reaches heaven, and
whose roots are set in the holy ground, and his name is “Mispar” and his place is in
the uppermost heaven… as it is written, “The heavens declare (me-SaPRim) the glory
(tifret) of God” (Ps. 19:1).  Were it not for this “Mispar” there would be neither
hosts nor offspring in any of the worlds.
(Zohar 2:105a)

This is intended to point the reader back to a familiar passage from the Bahir:

Why are they called Sephirot?
Because it is written (Psalm 19:2),
“The heavens declare (me-SaPRim) the glory (tifret) of God.”
(Bahir 125)

Tovia Singer's argument is deceptive and dishonest.  When the Psalm says "Kiss the Son (BAR), lest he be angry..." (Ps. 2:12) the word BAR definitely means "son".  Moreover the "son" in this verse refers to the Messiah and to the figure called in the Zohar "the Son of Yah" who is the "Middle Pillar" of the Godhead.

Don’t forget to support this work with your contributions, tithes and offerings.
Through our free Bible Correspondence course and other free literature and Operation Kiruv we are reaching a lost world with Torah and Messiah. Through our blogs, literature and podcasts we are also feeding young believers milk and mature believers nice juicy steaks.

 

Is this work worthy of your support? What other ministry provides this kind of teaching? Now is time to step up to the plate!

 

To make a donation, go to http://www.nazarenespace.com, click on the Pay Pal box and give whatever you can afford. (You can also donate directly thru PayPal by sending paypal donations to donations@wnae.org . You can also mail donations to

 

Nazarene Judaism

PO Box 471

Hurst, TX 76053

 

If everyone would do this, imagine what this ministry could accomplish.

 

James Trimm

Worldwide Nazarene Assembly of Elohim

Views: 471

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

 

Tovia is in fact BARred from sound reasoning!

Don't listen to that sadducee, he cannot even distinguish between sefroth of ketuvim.

1249. bar

bar: pure, clean

Original Word: בָּר
Transliteration: bar
Phonetic Spelling: (bar)
Short Definition: pure

Word Origin
from barar
Definition
pure, clean
NASB Word Usage
clean (1), innocent (1), pure (4), who are pure (1).

NAS Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible with Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries
Copyright © 1981, 1998 by The Lockman Foundation
All rights reserved Lockman.org

choice, clean, clear, pure

From barar (in its various senses); beloved; also pure, empty -- choice, clean, clear, pure.

see HEBREW barar

When the Psalm says "Kiss the Son (BAR), lest he be angry..." (Ps. 2:12) the word BAR definitely means "son".

"Bar" cannot be proven to mean son in (ancient) Hebrew, nor can it proven to be an Aramaic loanword in this instance.
It rather means the pure one or innocent one, (still) referring of course to Yeshua.

If it were an Aramaic loanword, it would be significant in being a very early instance of this, and very uncharacteristic of the Psalms.

what about the use in proverbs 31:2?

Let's look at the scriptural usage of the word:

Proverbs 14:4
BIB: אֲ֭לָפִים אֵב֣וּס בָּ֑ר וְרָב־ תְּ֝בוּא֗וֹת
NAS: are, the manger is clean, But much
KJV: [are], the crib [is] clean: but much
INT: oxen are the manger is clean much revenue

Psalm 19:8
BIB: מִצְוַ֥ת יְהוָ֥ה בָּ֝רָ֗ה מְאִירַ֥ת עֵינָֽיִם׃
NAS: of the LORD is pure, enlightening
KJV: of the LORD [is] pure, enlightening
INT: the commandment of the LORD is pure enlightening the eyes

Songs 6:9
BIB: הִיא֙ לְאִמָּ֔הּ בָּרָ֥ה הִ֖יא לְיֽוֹלַדְתָּ֑הּ
NAS: only [daughter]; She is the pure [child] of the one who bore
KJV: of her mother, she [is] the choice [one] of her that bare
INT: is her mother's is the pure who bore

Songs 6:10
BIB: יָפָ֣ה כַלְּבָנָ֗ה בָּרָה֙ כַּֽחַמָּ֔ה אֲיֻמָּ֖ה
NAS: as the full moon, As pure as the sun,
KJV: as the moon, clear as the sun,
INT: beautiful as the full pure as the sun awesome

Psalm 73:1
BIB: לְיִשְׂרָאֵ֥ל אֱלֹהִ֗ים לְבָרֵ֥י לֵבָֽב׃
NAS: to Israel, To those who are pure in heart!
KJV: to Israel, [even] to such as are of a clean heart.
INT: to Israel God who heart

Job 11:4
BIB: זַ֣ךְ לִקְחִ֑י וּ֝בַ֗ר הָיִ֥יתִי בְעֵינֶֽיךָ׃
NAS: And I am innocent in your eyes.'
KJV: [is] pure, and I am clean in thine eyes.
INT: is pure my teaching innocent am eyes

Psalm 24:4
BIB: נְקִ֥י כַפַּ֗יִם וּֽבַר־ לֵ֫בָ֥ב אֲשֶׁ֤ר ׀
NAS: hands and a pure heart,
KJV: hands, and a pure heart;
INT: has clean hands pure heart Who


As we see, Bar can be used as an adjective, describing clean things (like in Pro.31:2) or as a noun (like Songs 6:9).
The primary meaning appears to be "pure".
It certainly may overlap in meaning to the word for chosen, and more rarely, it is by extension in meaning applied to the pure or perhaps the purified sons/daughters/children; but if it meant "son" as in Aramaic, then it could even be used to describe an impure son or even a miscarriage, which is plainly not the case with the Hebrew word Bar (derived from Barar, to choose / to purify.)


Notice how it is used in the Song of Songs in the feminine, to describe two female personages. It could not mean "son". In fact it used as a noun describing a pure or choice or chosen daughter, and in the next verse, used adjectively to describe the Chammah, a feminine term for the heat or the Sun.

Again what about proverbs. 31:2?

What about it?

What about the fact that the word is used to describe a daughter in Song of Solomon ?

The primary meaning appears to be "pure".
It certainly may overlap in meaning to the word for chosen/selected, and more rarely, it is by extension in meaning applied to the pure or perhaps the purified sons/daughters/children of any gender, as plainly evident by the scriptural usage of the word.

If Lemuel is actually Solomon, as according to tradition, then Prov. 31 would be written by Bath-sheba to her son Solomon; now Solomon was indeed the chosen one, because despite not being the eldest child of David, he was chosen to be the king.
This meaning can still apply even if Lemuel is not synonymous with Solomon, seeing as Lemuel was a king.

It seems from the text that it was written by the king's mother at or shortly after the time the king had newly ascended to the throne, which fits perfectly.

James Trimm said:

Again what about proverbs. 31:2?

In my opinion Bar is direct reference to YHWH's Son Yeshua - the whole Psalm is 100 percent about Mashiach!  It is peculiar to use an Aramaic word there, but most definitely pregnant with beautiful meaning. 

Does anyone see a possible link to  בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא     ?   - Gen 1:1 in the beginning  (Elohim) created          

    בר    -   בראשית -      בָּרָא

ב   - Ben - Bar

ר - Ruach HaQodesh

א - Av YHWH

 Hints are encoded all over the Bible if we have eyes to see them.

Bar is a hebrew word meaning pure, chosen, selected, used to describe both males and females; so it can hardly mean "(male) son," and in fact this word is most often used as an adjective, rather than as a noun.
To ignore this is to ignore the "hints encoded all over the Bible", and worse, to ignore the literal surface meaning.

The chosen one referred to in Ps.2 is Yeshua, the pure and choice one of God; one does not have to mistranslate the text or ignore the Hebrew to make it so. Yeshua is on every page.

Yirmeyahu said:

In my opinion Bar is direct reference to YHWH's Son Yeshua - the whole Psalm is 100 percent about Mashiach!  It is peculiar to use an Aramaic word there, but most definitely pregnant with beautiful meaning.

 Hints are encoded all over the Bible if we have eyes to see them.

 [1913 Webster]

     3. Anything which obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an
      obstruction; a barrier.
      [1913 Webster]

            Must I new bars to my own joy create? --Dryden.
      [1913 Webster]



Solomon Avar said:

1249. bar

bar: pure, clean

Original Word: בָּר
Transliteration: bar
Phonetic Spelling: (bar)
Short Definition: pure

Word Origin
from barar
Definition
pure, clean
NASB Word Usage
clean (1), innocent (1), pure (4), who are pure (1).

NAS Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible with Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries
Copyright © 1981, 1998 by The Lockman Foundation
All rights reserved Lockman.org

choice, clean, clear, pure

From barar (in its various senses); beloved; also pure, empty -- choice, clean, clear, pure.

see HEBREW barar

 

it is futile argument to deny "bar" its equivocal meaning "son".  the JPS scholars (no mean pool of Jewish authority) used it that way in Proverbs 31:2. moreover, it is very evident that the entire psalm is talking about the anointed and "THE SON" saying straightly "beni Atah" and that is regardless whether a tovia singer exists or not, for the psalm itself is full of third person singular when alluding to The Son and Messiah, and certainly tovia does not use third person singular to mean "purity" or "holiness" for such needs no pronoun.

 

that is evidence that tovia has lost all the grounds, for if he had a better one he wouldn't rely on such pitiful argument to deny the sonship of Messiah.

 

I havent the time to look at all the discussion here,  but I did look at my Mikraot Gedalot and noticed how that in a way Tovia Singer is correct and in a way he is incorrect. Ibn Ezra is not the only one to apply the term "bar" to "Son", I believe also the Malbim does as well. In fact in his Tefillot David commentary he says of this phrase that one who serves Moshiach (the "Bar") is as one who is serving HaSh-m. In his Bi'ur Hamilot, the Malbim defines "bar" as the Nasi  who is pure and chosen like the heads of the house of the Fathers. He explains that as when one thrashes grain and the chaff is separated from the grain (bar), the grain is left and considered pure (bar) from the chaff. The grain (bar) is the chosen (bachur) material from the thrashing, and he connects this to a son (bar) being the chosen (bachur) of his mother. THe word "bar" has a variety of meanings and the Malbim connects them together in his commentary. So, to say R. Singer is incorrect is a bit too much- he is correct in what he assets but incorrect in what he denies. In other words, his commentary is half truth. 

In Metsudat Tzion, the commentator defines "bar" as One Who is pure and innocent. In Metsudat David, "bar"  may be interpereted a a King whose kingdom is to be received with purity of motive (or heart). The Radak incorporates Proverbs 31:2 as well in his interperetation, saying it is a pure servant reighning as King by the commandments of G-D as a servant to his Master. 

Interesting comments. Quite often the anti- missionaries bring in one aspect of rabbinic interpretation to further their cause, but omit conveniently those aspects that would undermine their cause and hope that nobody is read up enough or has the resources to examine their arguments. 

Shabbat Shalom!!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

 

 

 


















 

LINKS

 

 

 

 

Badge

Loading…

© 2014   Created by James Trimm.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service